Fontana Councilwoman Applauds Arizona Crackdown

Fontana Councilwoman Applauds Arizona Crackdown

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On the heels of Arizona’s sweeping immigration law signed Friday by Republican Governor Jan Brewer, Fontana Councilwoman Acquanetta Warren, is sounding off calling the crackdown overdue. She faulted U.S. immigration policy and suggested a new study linking illegal immigration with soaring Black unemployment and violence ‘damning evidence of failure’.

Sunday Warren, who is running for an Assembly seat in the June 8 Republican primary, made the rounds at local churches.

Fontana Councilwoman Acquanetta Warren says a study linking Black unemployment and violence is ‘damning’ evidence of failed U.S. immigration policy. The Republican candidate for State Assembly applauds Arizona’s controversial crackdown.
“When I walked in saying ‘good job Arizona’, people looked at me like I was from another planet. Enough is enough. For too long we’ve ignored the elephant in the room. What about illegal don’t people understand,” said Warren. She argues a Louisiana State University study is further proof illegal immigration is out of control and must be stopped.

“Latino Employment and Black Violence: The Unintended Consequence of U.S. Policy” was published in the March 2010 issue of “Social Forces”, the field’s preeminent journal.

Authors Louisiana State University Sociology Professor Edward Shihadeh and Ph.D. Candidate Raymond Barranco found the influx of Latino workers into a city increases unemployment and violence in the African-American community.

The findings conclude the arrival of large numbers of immigrant workers in an urban area displaces Blacks from low-skill jobs. That, in turn, leads to an uptick in violence.

"This is an unintended but significant result of immigration policies," Shihadeh lead author on the project said. "This is not a blame game. We do not advocate restricting the flow of Latino migrants in either direction. Our study simply describes how immigration policy opened a new chapter in the history of the U.S. labor market and how that harmed black communities."

The study notes that Latino workers who enter the United States illegally are less likely to return home than in years past for fear they won't be able to get back across the border at a later time.

"Blacks and Latinos both feel singled out and put upon, but few will address these issues because they're politically explosive," Shihadeh said. "The public mood makes this subject a live wire.”

Sociological theory has linked Black urban decline to poverty, the loss of manufacturing jobs and racial segregation. This study introduces another factor in the dense cluster of Black disadvantage - immigration policy, which inadvertently flooded low skill markets with Latino labor, displaced Blacks and, as a result, raised rates of Black vs. Latino gang violence and murder, the study suggested. Warren predicts the job crisis in Black communities will only get worse if Democrats adopt a policy of amnesty.

“Some Blacks and others criticize me for being a Republican. I challenge them to examine the Democratic Party’s lack of job creation in urban communities despite the party’s historical grip on the Black vote.”

“I see the effects of failed immigration policy every day,” says Warren -“The look on faces of African Americans who walk into a place looking for work. It’s as if they’re invisible. They don’t see themselves behind the counter.

They no longer see themselves in construction jobs, manufacturing, hotel housekeeping or even in low skilled fast food restaurant jobs.

Once thriving and proud Black communities like south central Los Angeles where I grew up are now largely brown enclaves. Black unemployment is at shameful levels.”

Warren says employers have been allowed to dodge labor laws often by demanding bilingual over qualification. “They don’t see hiring Blacks as an asset to their bottom line.” She supports tougher laws that prohibit employers from knowingly hiring illegal immigrants.

She said federal and state lawmakers fearful of alienating Latino voters have flip flopped or winked at illegal immigration. “It’s up to every voter in America to take a stand against lawmakers who refuse to act out of fear of losing votes. Force them to take a stand or move them along,” she said. Warren said if elected, she’s fully prepared to reach across the aisle to Democrats in order to get meaningful immigration legislation. “This is about saving America - all of us.”

When Republican Senator John McCain’s 2008 presidential bid stalled, many blamed his advocacy for the immigration reform bill in the Senate, which included a pathway to citizenship for the illegal immigrants already here in the country.

The measure failed after a firestorm of grassroots opposition.

The issue became an important touchstone in the Republican primary, as the candidates scrambled to one-up each other in their tough talk on immigration as they sought to appeal to primary voters.

The Arizona senator called the state’s new enforcement law a “tool that needs to be used.”

Warren dismissed as delaying tactics complaints by President Obama and others who charge the Arizona crackdown will lead to chaos, racial profiling and other abuse.

“Same old reasons not to act, these critics choose to ignore Governor Brewer’s assurances that racial profiling will not be tolerated and that police and others will receive sensitivity training,” said Warren. “This law takes the handcuffs off law enforcement and turns up the heat on real immigration reform.”