New America Now: Black in Japan, Brits in Afghanistan, Homeless in Central Valley

New America Now: Black in Japan, Brits in Afghanistan, Homeless in Central Valley

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This week's Ethnic Media Watch with Anthony Advincula and Mai Der Vang looks at North Korean propaganda in the Korean American community and a Vietnamese anti-Communist activist who is like a cross-dressing James Bond.

Stories discussed this week:
North Korean Advocacy Groups Appealing to Korean Youth in New York
 
For Ly Tong, Vietnam War Still Rages

 

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The recession has been especially hard on people already on the margins of society. Few people know that in California's Central Valley, often called the bread basket of the state, many farm workers are homeless and hungry, camping out in abandoned orchards. New America Media's Jacob Simas met some of them.


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Check out Jacob Simas' video here.


As Gen. Petraeus comes up with new strategies for the American troops in Afghanistan, it's worth taking a look at those who have tried to conquer Afghanistan centuries ago. Tamim Ansary's novel The Widow's Husband looks at the aftermath of the British conquest of Afghanistan and a disastrous war.


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For more information on The Widow's Husband or Tamim Ansary's other books check out his website.


A black man in rural Japan could be a traffic stopping example of cultural exchange. But the new film The Harimaya Bridge goes a step further. It's protagonist is an embittered African American man who goes unwillingly to Japan, a country where he lost his father (during World War II) and now his son (in a traffic accident). Bay Area director Aaron Woolfolk tells the story in his debut feature which makes him the first African American director of a a feature film in Japan.


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The Harimaya Bridge opens in the Bay Area this weekend at the Presidio Theater in San Francisco and the Berkeley Oaks in Berkeley. Woolfolk will attend a Q&A at some screenings. Check their website for more details.