Hard-Pressed Homeowners Face Another Threat: Association Dues

Hard-Pressed Homeowners Face Another Threat: Association Dues

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Estrella Bryant was at risk of losing her San Francisco town house last year.

Bryant, 70, had not fallen behind on her mortgage payments. Instead, she owed $560 in dues to the Parkview Heights Homeowners Association. The association turned over the case to a collection agency and threatened to foreclose unless Bryant paid off her debt, which increased tenfold because of fees and interest.

“It’s been a nightmare,” said Bryant, a Filipina immigrant who lives on Social Security and occasional bookkeeping jobs. She said she repeatedly asked Parkview Heights representatives why she was dealing with a debt collector instead of the association.

“Aren’t you supposed to help homeowners?” she asked.

With the help of a lawyer, Bryant worked out a payment plan and saved her home. But her ordeal reveals another dimension to the foreclosure crisis, in which homeowners associations nationwide have the same powers as banks and mortgage lenders, and they can exercise a little-known right to foreclose on homes. California law permits associations to initiate foreclosure proceedings when a debt exceeds $1,800, or if a lower amount of dues is owed for more than one year.

One out of every four California homeowners belongs to a homeowners association — entities that sell property and provide services in residential subdivisions with support from member dues. There are more than 15,000 associations in Northern California, according to Levy, Erlanger & Company, a professional services firm that caters to them.

Last year, associations foreclosed on about 300 Bay Area homes — twice as many as five years ago, according to an analysis by New America Media, a nonprofit news organization. The study used data from ForeclosureRadar.com, an independent Web site.

Association-initiated foreclosures are still a small fraction of the overall total in the Bay Area and elsewhere. But advocates for housing rights said the problem ran much deeper, as associations used the threat of foreclosure to intensify pressure on troubled homeowners. The associations often work with debt collectors who add fees and collection costs, causing the debt to skyrocket.

“People come up with money through a painful process; their home is being held hostage and the debt collector knows it,” said Marjorie Murray, who directs the Center for California Homeowner Association Law, an Oakland advocacy group.

Last week, the California Senate Judiciary Committee passed a bill to curtail predatory practices by collection agencies that can lead to ballooning debt and foreclosure proceedings. It would close a loophole that enables collection agencies to apply payments to their own fees and collection costs before paying down the original debt to homeowners associations. Current law forbids this, but debt collectors exploit vagueness in it to get homeowners to waive their rights.

Senator Ellen M. Corbett, Democrat of San Leandro, who co-sponsored the bill with the Center for California Homeowner Association Law, said the legislation was designed to give struggling homeowners a chance to catch up on payments to homeowners associations.

“Unscrupulous debt collectors are increasing the amount owed based on penalties and fees, and foreclosing on people’s homes,” Corbett said in an interview. “It’s a terrible practice. The penalties are just way too harsh.”

But Bay Area homeowners associations say they are feeling the same squeeze as the homeowners. Ken Johnson, president of the Eden Shores Homeowners Association in Hayward, said most homeowner associations were run by volunteers, who have neither the time nor the expertise to chase down delinquent homeowners.

Johnson said roughly half of his development’s 500 tract homes are in some stage of foreclosure, primarily because of mortgage defaults. Many of those homeowners are also delinquent on their assessments, he said. That means Eden Shores has less money to provide services, including maintenance of common areas like streets, swimming pools and parks.

Johnson said associations were not interested in taking over distressed properties.

“They don’t want to be liable for it; they just want the funds,” he said.

Andrew Fortin, a spokesman for the Community Associations Institute, an organization that supports homeowners associations nationwide, said the ability to collect dues was essential to ensure that associations were able to provide crucial services.

“You can understand why an association would want to be on top of collecting assessments, or everyone’s property value becomes zero,” Fortin said.

For homeowners, however, that process can be painful.

Bryant said she got into trouble when her bookkeeping assignments started to dwindle in the depressed economy. She began to pay her assessments every other month and fell two months behind. She said she had no idea her home was at risk until she received a notice from a collection agency.

By then, the agency, Association Lien Services, had applied an additional $1,000 in fees, documents show. To stave off foreclosure, Bryant said, she was desperate to work out a payment plan, but the agency’s offer required her to sign an agreement to allow her payments to go toward collection costs before being applied to her delinquent dues, circumventing a state law requiring that payments go toward the original debt before being applied to fees.

Instead of signing the document, Bryant obtained a pro bono lawyer. She recently paid the full amount she owed the association and worked out a deal to pay a fifth of the nearly $2,500 in collection costs.

Jane Fay, president of the Parkview Heights Homeowners Association, said that she sympathized with Bryant but that she believed the board acted responsibly in trying to collect the overdue assessments.

She did not agree with all of her debt collector’s practices, Fay said, but homeowners associations have few options besides pursuing the debt. Delinquents must shoulder part of the blame, she said.

“You’re an adult,” she said. “You haven’t paid, and you know you haven’t paid. There are repercussions.”

Fay said she was named president of the association in the middle of Bryant’s dispute and did not have enough information to know “right or wrong.” She said the association waived some late charges and interest.

“We don’t want the association to be making money off of homeowners who are in dire financial straits,” Fay said.

For collection agencies, however, the foreclosure process can be profitable.

David Swedelson is managing partner of Swedelson & Gottlieb, a Southern California law firm that operates Association Lien Services. Mr. Swedelson said homeowners associations contracted with collection agencies because the latter could cut through “government red tape and requirements” and resolve cases “a lot faster.”

Swedelson’s law firm boasts on its Web site that it can collect delinquent assessments, costs and fees in “90 percent of cases,” and said it believed that “foreclosure is the fastest and most effective way to collect overdue assessments.”

To see video and read more about homeowners in the Bay Area who were reported to debt collectors by their homeowners associations, click here.

Irma Herrera and Suzanne Manneh contributed reporting. This story is a project of New America Media's investigative affairs reporting.

Photo credit: Adithya Sambamurthy/The Bay Citizen

 

Comments

 
Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

That is why people should never EVER live in a property where these control freaks want to tell you how often to take a s**t. I pay money for a place to live, it's MY home and they can take a hike. Most of these association are old, retired, control freaks who really like to tell others what to do. They probably have no power at home or at work, so they strut their stuff with others. They need to be reigned in.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I am a Mortgage Broker.. originates loans.. and we all in the business, know how the Washighton screwed up the mortgage business with all the new laws.. PER SE to protect the borrower.. look at this HOA.. that has the power to put people out of their home... WOW,

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

“You can understand why an association would want to be on top of collecting assessments, or everyone’s property value becomes zero,” Fortin said.

My property isn't going to become worthless because I have a few weeds in the yard, didn't take my trash to my garage by the end of the day or took down my Christmas lights within 15 days of the holiday. These are the things that led to my HOA trying to foreclose on my house - it wasn't the dues by the fees. I refused to pay a fine to pick my weeds three days after it rained and I was not able to do yard work on Thursday. There seems to be no recourse once things ge this far. The HOA members don't care they only want fees that I feel they are not owed. In the end I had to 1800 dollars of a 4000 settlement because of lates fees on top of fees and interest.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Do not, I repeat DO NOT buy a home with a HA included! They are a waist of time, money, and do nothing good that the city cant do for the neighborhood.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

A filipino immigrant that lives on Social Security!!! That's why our kids won't have it in the future. Our government goes out of their way to screw our natural born citizens and give handouts to immigrants. Total B.S.!!!

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Filipina immigrant LIVING ON SOCIAL SECURITY? How does a immigrant qualify for this?

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

The homeowners association dues are used to pay ongoing expenses of the association and any homeowner that does not pay their dues is freeloading off the other homeowners that are paying. The dues pay for water, garbage, electricity, elevator maintenance, building repairs and maintenance, insurance, property management, fire sprinkler and fire alarm maintenance, and fund reserves that are needed when the building requires major work such as a new roof, paint, recoating of walkways and decks, elevator replacement. If you think it is not fair of the association to charge dues, then you should not have purchased a unit in the association. You are better off living in a single family home or renting.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

How the hell is the woman pictured 70 years old?

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

What a joke! With foreclosures as high as they are, I'm assuming they want more empty homes then?

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Are there any limits (in California...) to the fees that a debt collector adds to the original debt? There should be - the debt collector is entitled to a profit, yes: but that profit shouldn't be outrageous, as some I've heard of are...

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Never buy property that has HOA

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I live in a community that has a HOA but no common areas so all our association does is collect fees and remind us to cut our grass or tell us what color we can paint our homes. Basically we pay a fee so that they can pay someone to collect our HOS fees

We removed the provision that allows them to foreclose on a property for delinquent dues. They don't provide a service and are basically there because of California law.

It's ridiculous that a HOA can foreclose on a property when a homeowner is already struggling to pay the mortgage. There needs to be some compassion for those who legitimately have financial issues. Losing your house for $1500 is ridiculous

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I live in a community that has a HOA but no common areas so all our association does is collect fees and remind us to cut our grass or tell us what color we can paint our homes. Basically we pay a fee so that they can pay someone to collect our HOS fees

We removed the provision that allows them to foreclose on a property for delinquent dues. They don't provide a service and are basically there because of California law.

It's ridiculous that a HOA can foreclose on a property when a homeowner is already struggling to pay the mortgage. There needs to be some compassion for those who legitimately have financial issues. Losing your house for $1500 is ridiculous

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I live in a community that has a HOA but no common areas so all our association does is collect fees and remind us to cut our grass or tell us what color we can paint our homes. Basically we pay a fee so that they can pay someone to collect our HOS fees

We removed the provision that allows them to foreclose on a property for delinquent dues. They don't provide a service and are basically there because of California law.

It's ridiculous that a HOA can foreclose on a property when a homeowner is already struggling to pay the mortgage. There needs to be some compassion for those who legitimately have financial issues. Losing your house for $1500 is ridiculous

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

See looks pretty young to be 70

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

i owed 6k of HOA, the collection agency added about 4 more k on me and sent me alot of letters saying they was gonna put a lien , foreclose my condo.i got scared so i called them to put me on a payment plan but not with the whole 4 k extra ,maybe 2.they say no...i said foreget it...i heard that if ur house worths less then what u owe, the HOA will not foreclose it because the bank gets the money first

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

they should make HOA dues tax deductible

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

To Anonymous who made the comment:" Filipina immigrant LIVING ON SOCIAL SECURITY? How does a immigrant qualify for this?"

This is how... Legal immigrants, who work in the US pay all the taxes YOU pay including Social Security and Medicare. So they ARE eligible for Social Security as it is taken from their pay checks. Saying someone is an immigrant does not automatically mean that they are illegal immigrants!

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I love my association. And when you buy a home it in black and white. The rules!!! Just like all the dumb ass out there that thought they could buy a house that was 500,000 and had 3 kids that only made $15.00 hours was a good idea. You don't pay your electric bill and the power gets shut of, right?
That why this country is falling apart. Every one wants a hand out from some body. And they are to lazy and or busy on facebook to read the rules when they signed the agreement of the HOA. Grow up!

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I love my association. And when you buy a home it in black and white. The rules!!! Just like all the dumb ass out there that thought they could buy a house that was 500,000 and had 3 kids that only made $15.00 hours was a good idea. You don't pay your electric bill and the power gets shut of, right?
That why this country is falling apart. Every one wants a hand out from some body. And they are to lazy and or busy on facebook to read the rules when they signed the agreement of the HOA. Grow up!

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I love my association. And when you buy a home it in black and white. The rules!!! Just like all the dumb a____ out there that thought they could buy a house that was 500,000 and had 3 kids that only made $15.00 hours was a good idea. You don't pay your electric bill and the power gets shut of, right?
That why this country is falling apart. Every one wants a hand out from some body. And they are to lazy and or busy on facebook to read the rules when they signed the agreement of the HOA. Grow up!

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

To Anonymous who made the comment:" Filipina immigrant LIVING ON SOCIAL SECURITY? How does a immigrant qualify for this?"

This is how... Legal immigrants, who work in the US pay all the taxes YOU pay including Social Security and Medicare. So they ARE eligible for Social Security as it is taken from their pay checks. Saying someone is an immigrant does not automatically mean that they are illegal immigrants!

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I remember during the '80 housing bust a gal lost her home for $1096 due as HOA auction.
she could not afford it after the inflationary period of the 70s.....cut the value of the dollar

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I remember during the '80 housing bust a gal lost her home for $1096 due as HOA auction.
she could not afford it after the inflationary period of the 70s.....cut the value of the dollar

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I remember during the '80 housing bust a gal lost her home for $1096 due as HOA auction.
she could not afford it after the inflationary period of the 70s.....cut the value of the dollar

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Wow! A lot of people are so p*ssed off that when they see the word "immigrant", they automatically assume they are illegal and living off of the citizens' tax money. FYI, legal immigrants who work pay taxes the same way US citizens do, the biggest difference is they cannot vote.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I was a Director of the HOA Board for some years. We were all 'volunteers' but we chose these responsibilities. When I resigned, accounts receivable were approximately $75,000. Past dues were increasing steadily. However, after my resignation, I saw in a newsletter that they are re-opening the pool this season. Just to re-open will cost $10,000. Maintenance and inspection will cost much more. When it had been open, only two units used it, and my first motion to close it until we got caught up was not carried. The second was carried.
I have been on both sides of the fence here. Directors are just people, and some have no common sense, i.e., a suggestion was made to turn off the water in units that are behind in their dues. I said the Health Dept. wouldn't allow it, no one believed me, our 'attorney' was consulted at a hefty fee and wrote five single spaced pages to tell them the same. ALL THEY HAD TO DO WAS CHECK WITH THE HEALTH DEPT. AT NO COST AT ALL.
Penny wise and pound foolish is another example. Owners who are not very far behind, have asked if a payment agreement can be made just to give them a chance to catch up. When the complex is tightening its belt, I feel some money is better than no money. Nope. Indeed, with full knowledge that recovery will NEVER be possible, they paid the collection agency, paid to put a lien on a condo from which the lender will get first dibs, and have even gone to Small Claims Court! Would you believe? Win the case and then what? The owners live right here, we know where to find them, they have no jobs.
I've been paying excessive dues for those who have not, and the newsletter said that we may be re-accessed for the cost of opening the pool.
I'm now past due three months as I have not been able to work.
If I faced foreclosure, and after what I have invested in my condo, I'd have absolutely no place to go. Me, my wheelchair and my cat. No options but a very final one.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

WTF Do the financial banksters run it all? I rent and if it burns to the ground so be it.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I think associations should be banned. My parents purchase a home that unfortunately fell under an association in Northern California and they were so awful, that a group of homeowners, including my parents decided not to pay them anymore. Well, they threatened to foreclose and everyone backed down. They are the most worthless association around. They maintain an apartment complex across the street, but do nothing for the homeowners' properties except enforce their absurd rules. Something needs to be done about them. They are a complete scam.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

When I bought my house I absolutely refused to buy any property having anything to do with a homeowners association. Homeowners associations are just another meddlesome "landlord". For me a major reason to buy my own house is to not be beholden to a landlord who will meddle in my property and to be out from under never ending rent. Why on earth would I buy a property only to continue paying "rent" (HA dues/fees/whatever) to give someone else an open door to poke their nose in my business?

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

A homeowners association generally takes care of the outside of the property, the streets, lighting, landscaping, roofing, swimming pool/hot tub maintenance, etc. Generally everything outside of the owner's interior walls. The only way they are able to maintain the property is by collecting dues.

If 10% of the residences go delinquent, they will have a 10% drop in revenues and thus have to cut back on maintenance by 10% (or more).

The one thing you should NOT do is to go delinquent on your HOA dues. With the current housing market, It is better to go delinquent on your mortgage payments. With a backlog of inventory banks do not want to foreclose. But HOA's have not choice if they are to collect what is needed to maintain the property.

Yes, they do control the noise level, color of the buildings, where you park your cars, etc. But look at associations that enforce these controls compared to those that don't. The property looks much better and the quality of life is much calmer. You have to give something to get something.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

I'm the President for our HOA and like many others have struggled to maintain my dues along with an increasing mortgage, however, buying a home is a gamble. I never expected my home value to drop 75% of what I paid for it.. Regardless, when others don't pay their dues, it causes those of us who are staying affloat to be penalized with higher increased dues. I've read here that some don't believe HOA's do anything, when in fact each Association operates differently. Some provide more services and features than others. The services our HOA provides is pretty much everything except what occurs on the inside of our property, but at $307 per month, I'd expect everything except what occurs inside my home. I agree that pressure to pay what's owed can be painful, but it's also an obligation when entering into that agreement. Most HOA's don't want to own your property, they can and will work with you to pay off an outstanding balance. Even it's an extra $10 per month on top of current dues. Inclusive to that, interest can be negotiated. Talk with your Board of Directors and ask that interest and fees be wiped from your account if you maintain payment efforts. If not, and you maintain your payments with an agreed upon extra toward past amount due, no additional fees or interest will accrue.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

A filipino immigrant that lives on Social Security!!! That's why our kids won't have it in the future. Our government goes out of their way to screw our natural born citizens and give handouts to immigrants. Total B.S.!!!
Why sign your name as Anonymous ?? Think you are natural born and super smart, then explain the terms: RSDI, SSI, SSP, SSA. Only Stup didn not know This country found by immigrants, grown up and get wealthy because of immigrants. I am not talking about legal or illegal, Asian or White.
Next time, if you try to be smart, Sarah Palin "kissass" or Tea party loyalist, please learn US history, do more research and best of all, Identify yourself. It is the AMERICAN way, isn't it??
Jason Chang

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Laws, take what you can, and move on!

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

fking blood suckers.. home owner asso ciation

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

How many homeowners in this country actually need HOA ???. I don't. It's a waste of money. They take your money, they don't care if you need their service or not and they control your house, tell you what to do. For example, when you need to replace your fence and repaint you house you need to ask them for permission. That is so stupid. They force us to pay fee so they can have a job. It is a shame. They need to get a real job and stop rip off homeowners. Is there a way to put this into a ballot so people can vote? I rather use that money to buy food or put in saving instead of paying to HOA.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

To Anonymous, An immigrant qualifies for Social Security the same as you do- by working and paying into the system dumbell

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

An immigrant qualifies for Social Security the same way you do - by working and paying into the system. You must have skipped civics class

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

How many homeowners in this country actually need HOA ???. I don't. It's a waste of money. They take your money, they don't care if you need their service or not and they control your house, tell you what to do. For example, when you need to replace your fence and repaint you house you need to ask them for permission. That is so stupid. They force us to pay fee so they can have a job. It is a shame. They need to get a real job and stop rip off homeowners. Is there a way to put this into a ballot so people can vote? I rather use that money to buy food or put in saving instead of paying to HOA.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

An immigrant qualifies for Social Security the same way you do - by working and paying into the system. You must have skipped civics class

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

"Yes, they do control the noise level, color of the buildings, where you park your cars, etc. But look at associations that enforce these controls compared to those that don't. The property looks much better and the quality of life is much calmer. You have to give something to get something."
Ideal, if it were only true. Perhaps in some cases, it is, but not here. The place badly needs painting, wooden railings on balconies are rotting, and "we" are opening a pool. It's really all about prestige, just like, wow, I live in a gated community! We spend thousands on repair of the gate; it's easy to come through by following a car that belongs here. Miscreants climb over it, damage A/C units on the roof, (owner responsible for repair), all 52 storage units were recently vandalized...locks broken and doors ripped off, (owner responsible). Cars have been stolen as well. The pool will attract more buyers, the president said. A postage sized pool where dirty baby diapers were thrown, dogs defecated in it, boom boxes after 10p, (quiet time not enforced).
I live in a very pleasant part of the city, overlooking a lovely lake. This is NOT ghetto country. It's life.
But what did I get for dues over 300% what they were? Garbage paid. (One bag a week). At most, 12 sq. feet of grass trimmed on the street side, (I don't live on the street), electricity for one light at the end of the common walkway. I'd be far better off paying these things myself.
I never got what I paid for, never.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

do not buy a property with HOA, period.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

"the HOA will not foreclose it because the bank gets the money first "

That's true. If the HOA has the brains to realize that, and not pour good money after bad.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Most association dues are unreasonably high, and often are a part of very deliberate and well orchestrated scam, setup by the original developers of the properties. The scam is designed in such ways to provide unaccounted and lifelong venues to "legally" rob homeowners. I lived in a HOA infected condominium in NW Portland Oregon for three years. Our HOA in collaboration with a corrupt management company would use any lame excuse to spend the savings, and even ask for more money at times to fix non-existing problems. They also have a few corrupt private company inspectors on payroll to give legitimacy to their claims. Through the assistance of these corrupt agencies, management companies create and forge documents to substantiate the need for unnecessary repairs and maintenance.

HOA is a fast spreading cancer in America, there are no safeguards in place to protect the homeowners from these blood-suckers. I found out that in the State of Oregon there is practically no guidelines or agency to oversee the HOA operations. There needs to be a Federal Bill to regulate the practices of HOAs in America.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Most association dues are unreasonably high, and often are a part of very deliberate and well orchestrated scam, setup by the original developers of the properties. The scam is designed in such ways to provide unaccounted and lifelong venues to "legally" rob homeowners. I lived in a HOA infected condominium in NW Portland Oregon for three years. Our HOA in collaboration with a corrupt management company would use any lame excuse to spend the savings, and even ask for more money at times to fix non-existing problems. They also have a few corrupt private company inspectors on payroll to give legitimacy to their claims. Through the assistance of these corrupt agencies, management companies create and forge documents to substantiate the need for unnecessary repairs and maintenance.

HOA is a fast spreading cancer in America, there are no safeguards in place to protect the homeowners from these blood-suckers. I found out that in the State of Oregon there is practically no guidelines or agency to oversee the HOA operations. There needs to be a Federal Bill to regulate the practices of HOAs in America.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

Most association dues are unreasonably high, and often are a part of very deliberate and well orchestrated scam, setup by the original developers of the properties. The scam is designed in such ways to provide unaccounted and lifelong venues to "legally" rob homeowners. I lived in a HOA infected condominium in NW Portland Oregon for three years. Our HOA in collaboration with a corrupt management company would use any lame excuse to spend the savings, and even ask for more money at times to fix non-existing problems. They also have a few corrupt private company inspectors on payroll to give legitimacy to their claims. Through the assistance of these corrupt agencies, management companies create and forge documents to substantiate the need for unnecessary repairs and maintenance.

HOA is a fast spreading cancer in America, there are no safeguards in place to protect the homeowners from these blood-suckers. I found out that in the State of Oregon there is practically no guidelines or agency to oversee the HOA operations. There needs to be a Federal Bill to regulate the practices of HOAs in America.

Anonymous

Posted Apr 15 2011

If you are planning to buy into a home owners association be exceeding carefull! Better yet don't.
Board members tend to be exceedingly possessive of their territory,create rules to meet their
needs,establish excessive fines,hold "hearings" and act like they are Gods gift to the world.
Board members are very definitely "control freaks" Anonymous

Anonymous

Posted Apr 16 2011

NEVER BUY INTO AN HOA PROPERTY unless you like being told what to do by control freaks, with power to fine or foreclose.
20 yr mortgage broker

Anonymous

Posted Apr 16 2011

NEVER BUY INTO AN HOA PROPERTY unless you like being told what to do by control freaks, with the power to fine or foreclose.
20 yr mortgage broker

Anonymous

Posted Apr 16 2011

NEVER BUY INTO AN HOA PROPERTY unless you like being told how to live by control freaks, with the power to fine and foreclose.
20 yr mortgage broker

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