NAM Radio: US Soldiers & Fragging Assaults in Vietnam

NAM Radio: US Soldiers & Fragging Assaults in Vietnam

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In the latter half of the Vietnam war, as Vietnamization took hold and U.S. soldiers became increasingly aware that the war was unwinnable, military morale was waning. There are endless theories about how the morale shifted into negativity. Some say it was the protests back home, others say it was enlistment practices.

The only certain thing was that it was well-known that low morale was having a serious effect on military operations -- an effect that was most visible in the growing incidents of fragging.

Fragging is a very specific type of friendly fire, except it's not exactly unintentional. It's a term that originated during the Vietnam War when officers were known to attack and sometimes kill each other and their superiors by using fragmentation grenades.

The number of fragging incidents during the Vietnam War still remains uncertain, but author George Lepre's new book, Fragging: Why US Soldiers Assaulted Their Officers in Vietnam, is the first in-depth study of the practice and its origins. He spoke with New America Now Host Shirin Sadeghi.


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New America Now's Complete Show for July 1 and 3, 2011:


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New America Now is the radio program of New America Media. The program is hosted by Shirin Sadeghi and is broadcast on 91.7 FM KALW San Francisco on Fridays at noon and Sundays at 3 pm.
 
Click here to follow Shirin Sadeghi on Twitter.
 
To visit the archives of New America Now, please click here.  
 
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