Aging Up: Successful Foster Youth Highlight Flaws in Nation's Care Systems

Story tools

Comments

A A AResize

Print

Share and Email

 
It’s hard for Sixto Cancel, a lifelong, now former, foster kid, to fight the feelings of guilt that will occasionally creep up when he thinks about his life journey.

Last week, the 20-year-old Afro-Hispanic college freshman traveled to the nation’s capital, by invitation of congresswoman Karen Bass (D-Calif.), to attend the presidential inauguration and talk foster care system reform with other lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

Cancel, an outspoken national advocate for foster youth, is one of the 424,000 children and young adults currently in the nation’s foster care systems–or are soon to age out of care upon reaching their 18th birthday–where, after surviving the challenges of foster care, they come face-to-face with the challenges of young adulthood, often made worst by traumatic upbringings.

At the outset, many of these young people don't receive the services and care that would reduce the almost inevitable likelihood of free falling towards unemployment, homelessness and general aimlessness once they have aged out of the system. That's why national advocates and lawmakers are seeking reforms and just the right formula to duplicate Cancel's improbable success.

Although Connecticut's foster care system supports foster children until age 21, Cancel is no longer in state care. He now lives in Richmond, Va., where he attends Virginia Commonwealth University, and supports himself by working for Rising Tides, a nonprofit that promotes self-sufficiency for aged out foster youth. His 10 brothers and sisters, several of whom are still in Connecticut’s foster care system, are on his mind as he absorbs Washington, D.C. and all of its pre-inauguration pageantry.

During a lunch meeting with former foster care youth and Rep. Bass at a cozy Chinese restaurant, mere blocks away from where he would watch President Barack Obama's historic second inauguration the next morning, Cancel tugged his rimless glasses from his face, placed them on the table and wiped away tears from his eyes. Read more here.
 

Comments

 

Disclaimer: Comments do not necessarily reflect the views of New America Media. NAM reserves the right to edit or delete comments. Once published, comments are visible to search engines and will remain in their archives. If you do not want your identity connected to comments on this site, please refrain from commenting or use a handle or alias instead of your real name.