Tighter Restrictions on Family Visas Being Considered

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 LOS ANGELES – As news of a bi-partisan group of senators are close to finishing a comprehensive immigration reform bill, some immigrant groups are worried about one aspect of the possible legislation that may have a tremendous impact in the Asian American and immigrant community.

According to several reports, one of the trade offs being considered in the “Gang of 8’s” comprehensive immigration reform bill would be placing tighter limits on the number of family-based visas and increasing the number of visas available for high skilled foreign workers.

The Asian Pacific American Legal Center on Friday issued a statement urging those senators not to limit the number of family based petitions as it would severely impact Asian American families from reuniting with their loved ones.

“An integral part of our humanity is the understanding that children – at any age – are our family. That brothers and sisters are our family,” said Stewart Kwoh, APALC executive director.

“To contend otherwise goes against our longstanding American tradition of valuing, respecting, and honoring brothers, sisters, and children as beloved close family members. Families must not be manipulated and used as a bargaining chip in a misleading and misguided attempt to characterize immigration as a zero-sum game,” Kwoh added.LOS ANGELES – As news of a bi-partisan group of senators are close to finishing a comprehensive immigration reform bill, some immigrant groups are worried about one aspect of the possible legislation that may have a tremendous impact in the Asian American and immigrant community.

According to several reports, one of the trade offs being considered in the “Gang of 8’s” comprehensive immigration reform bill would be placing tighter limits on the number of family-based visas and increasing the number of visas available for high skilled foreign workers.

The Asian Pacific American Legal Center on Friday issued a statement urging those senators not to limit the number of family based petitions as it would severely impact Asian American families from reuniting with their loved ones.

“An integral part of our humanity is the understanding that children – at any age – are our family. That brothers and sisters are our family,” said Stewart Kwoh, APALC executive director.

“To contend otherwise goes against our longstanding American tradition of valuing, respecting, and honoring brothers, sisters, and children as beloved close family members. Families must not be manipulated and used as a bargaining chip in a misleading and misguided attempt to characterize immigration as a zero-sum game,” Kwoh added. Read more here.