George Zimmerman Found Not Guilty

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 Saturday, July 13, 10:04 p.m. EDT: The all-female jury found George Zimmerman, the former neighborhood-watch captain who shot and killed unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, not guilty after deliberating for 16 hours and 20 minutes. Martin's family was not present in the courtroom as the verdict was read.

Saturday, July 13, 9:44 a.m. EDT: Jurors in George Zimmerman's murder trial began their second day of deliberations after talking for three and a half hours on Friday, according to the Associated Press. The sequestered jury is composed of six women -- all but one of them is white. They must sift through opposing testimony from police, neighbors, friends and family members.

Friday, July 12, 2:25 p.m. EDT: Prosecutor John Guy rebutted defense attorney Mark O'Mara's closing argument that the state hadn't proved George Zimmerman's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, according to the Associated Press. He accused the former neighborhood-watch captain of telling "so many lies" and argued that the unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin felt fear as Zimmerman followed him. He said the case is not about race and that Zimmerman had "blood on his hands." Following the state's rebuttal, Judge Debra Nelson told jurors that they must determine whether the killing was "justifiable."

Friday, July 12, 12:10 p.m. EDT: Defense attorney Mark O'Mara wrapped up his closing argument, saying that the state's case was full of gaps and built on a series of "could've beens" and "maybes," the Associated Press reports. And in a statement that set Twitter abuzz, he said that the unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was actually armed with concrete during the scuffle. Prosecutors began their rebuttal.

Friday, July 12, 9:35 a.m. EDT: Defense attorney Mark O'Mara began closing arguments by telling jurors that prosecutors hadn't proved George Zimmerman's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, according to the Associated Press. He also showed the controversial 3-D animation of the shooting, after Judge Debra Nelson ruled that it could be used, but not as evidence.

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