La Opinión: One Year After DACA

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Editors of La Opinión write that legalizing children and not their parents will result in splitting up families.

A year ago, hundreds of thousands of young people felt the relief of no longer having to live under the constant threat of deportation. They would no longer be excluded from the opportunities society affords in the only country they know, the one they consider their home.

The problem is that the peace of mind that the Obama administration gave them with its Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy has a two-year time limit. It temporarily corrects a situation that requires a permanent solution, so more than half a million applicants can have the security they need to plan their futures and progress, in order to become productive contributors to this nation.

Some people resent the fact that the DREAMers have such a high profile—and even question why only now, in the middle of the immigration debate, are they defending their parents. These complaints about DACA's beneficiaries do not change the reality everyone knows, that legalizing children and not their parents will result in splitting up families.

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