More Than 100 Women Arrested in Immigration Reform Protest

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WASHINGTON—More than 100 women were arrested Thursday morning after blocking the intersection outside the House of Representatives to protest the House’s inaction on comprehensive immigration reform.

The act of civil disobedience included more than 20 undocumented immigrants, the largest number of undocumented immigrant women to willingly submit to arrest. The 104 women who were arrested came from 20 states across the country to draw attention to the fact that women and children constitute three-quarters of immigrants to the U.S. and disproportionately bear the burden of the failed immigration system.

Prior to the act of civil disobedience, more than 300 women and children gathered for a press conference in front of the Capitol Building, where national leaders – including Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren, ranking minority member on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security; Pramila Jayapal of We Belong Together; Bertha Lewis of the Black Institute; Terry O’Neill of NOW; Rocio Inclan of National Education Association; and three undocumented women – spoke out about how women disproportionately bear the burden of the failed system.

Faith leaders led the entire group in taking an Oath for a House United. Following the arrests, children delivered “red hearts of courage” to House leadership and key swing representatives to embolden them to take action for comprehensive immigration reform.

Women who participated in the civil disobedience are demanding that the House of Representatives shows courage in passing fair immigration reform that includes the priorities of women: a roadmap to citizenship for undocumented women, a strong family immigration system which remains the primary way that women obtain legal status, and strong protections for women workers and victims of violence.

Read more at WeBelongTogether.org

 

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